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On which calendar dates can't an upsherin be held?

by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg

  

Library » Life Cycle » Upsherin | Subscribe | What is RSS?


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There are quite a few days on the Jewish calendar when it is forbidden or discouraged to take a haircut. If the child’s third birthday falls on any of these days, the Upsherin is postponed rather than cutting the child’s hair before he is fully three years old. The Upsherin is then observed at the first possible permitted opportunity.

If the child’s third birthday falls on any of these days, the Upsherin is postponed rather than cutting the child’s hair before he is fully three years old
The following are the days when haircuts are not taken:

• Shabbat

• Biblical holidays – including Chol Hamoed

• Rosh Chodesh

• The period of the Counting of the Omer--with the exception of Lag b'Omer. On Lag b'Omer, all children whose third birthday was in the first 33 days of the Omer receive their upsherins.1

• The Three Weeks (between the 17th of Tammuz and the 9th of Av)

Footnotes

  • 1. See "What is the preferred location for an Upsherin ceremony?" . (http://www.askmoses.com/en/article/114,2040946/On-which-calendar-dates-cant-an-upsherin-be-held.html)

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Shabbat
(pl: Shabbatot). Hebrew word meaning "rest." It is a Biblical commandment to sanctify and rest on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. This commemorates the fact that after creating the world in six days, G-d rested on the seventh.
Rosh Chodesh
The "Head of the Month," Rosh Chodesh is observed the first day of every Jewish month. If the previous month had 30 days, then the last day of the previous month is also observed; hence a two-day Rosh Chodesh. Rosh Chodesh is a semi-holiday, marked by Torah-reading and special prayers.
Chol Hamoed
(lit. "mundane [days] of the festival"), the intermediate days of the Festivals of Passover and Sukkot. On these days many of the holiday work restrictions are lifted.
Omer
Starting from the second day of Passover, we count forty-nine days. The fiftieth day is the holiday of Shavuot. This is called the “Counting of the Omer” because on the second day of Passover the barley “Omer” offering was offered in the Holy Temple, and we count forty-nine days from this offering. [Literally, "Omer" is a certain weight measure; the required amount of barley for this sacrifice.]
Av
The fifth month of the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to July-August. The saddest month of the year due to the destruction of the Temples, and the many other tragedies which befell the Jews in this month.
Tammuz
The fourth month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to June-July.
Upsherin
(Yiddish) Haircut. Usually a reference to a boy's first haircut, traditionally done on his third birthday.