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'Here Comes the Bride', the un-sung wedding song

by Rabbi Shlomie Chein

  

Library » Life Cycle » Marriage » The Wedding | Subscribe | What is RSS?


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Question:

Why don't they play, "Here comes the bride" at a Jewish wedding?

Answer:

We have our own beautiful Jewish songs to sing at Jewish weddings. At such an important milestone in life we wish to emphasize that it is a Jewish milestone in a Jewish life, and so it is no wonder that we choose Jewish songs for this event.

Furthermore, the traditional Jewish songs are not just nice melodies, but blessings as well.

When the bride and groom come under the Chupah canopy a cantor sings the following song (usually in Hebrew):

”Blessed are those who are coming. He Who is the Al-mighty and Omnipotent, over all; He Who is blessed over all; He Who is the greatest of all; He Who is distinguished of all; He shall bless the groom and the bride.”


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Here Comes The Bride at Weddings

Posted by: Anonymous, New York, NY on May 03, 2008

We must also remember that Richard Wagner, the composer of this music, was an Anti-Semite, and Hitler's favorite composer.
Chupah
Wedding canopy. Under this canopy, the groom betroths the bride with the customary ring, and the traditional marriage benedictions are recited.