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Is cashmere the same as wool with regards to shatnez?
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What can I do for my wonderful Shabbat hosts?

  

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Rabbi Yossi Turk: Bienvenidos Welcome. Un minuto ya lo atiendo. I'll be with you in a moment...

Grateful: I feel bad always going to Shabbos meals but not being able to return the favor, how can I bless someone else for their hospitality.

Rabbi Yossi Turk: you can take flowers before Shabbat

Rabbi Yossi Turk: bring them a bottle of Kosher wine

Rabbi Yossi Turk: a tablecloth

Grateful: bringing things would be an appropriate way of saying thanks?

Rabbi Yossi Turk: sure

Rabbi Yossi Turk: im sure it will be appreciated

Grateful: ok, i just felt bad always recieving but never giving

Rabbi Yossi Turk: understandable

Grateful: Thank you, Rabbi, have a wonderful week.

Rabbi Yossi Turk: same


[Ed. note: Also read "What may I bring my host on Shabbat?"]


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Shabbat
(pl: Shabbatot). Hebrew word meaning "rest." It is a Biblical commandment to sanctify and rest on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. This commemorates the fact that after creating the world in six days, G-d rested on the seventh.
Kosher
Literally means "fit." Commonly used to describe foods which are permitted by Jewish dietary laws, but is also used to describe religious articles (such as a Torah scroll or Sukkah) which meet the requirements of Jewish law.