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Are there any dates which are especially auspicious for getting married?

by Mrs. Dinka Kumer

  

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While the menu, band, and floral arrangements will remain sweet memories of your wedding, more important is the date you wed, which will have lasting impact on your life of married bliss.


The absolute no-no wedding dates are during Sefirat Haomer1 and the "Three Weeks" (see below) which are national periods of mourning.


However, there are indeed dates which are known to be more auspicious (specifically the months of Kislev, Adar and Elul):


Tishrei: The days between Yom Kippur and Sukkot.


Mar Cheshvan: Many do not marry in this month at all.


Kislev: The entire month is extremely auspicious.


Tevet: The first half of the month.2


Shevat: The first half of the month.


Adar: The entire month is very auspicious (both 'Adar's during a Leap Year).


Nissan: The days until Passover.


Iyar: Sefirat Haomer prohibits weddings (for different customs, see footnote 1).


Sivan: The first half of the month, but only starting from after the 3rd of Sivan (for different customs, see footnote 1).


Tammuz: The first half of the month.


Menachem Av: the 11-15th of the month.


Elul: the entire month is auspicious.


In addition to this, the 'rules of engagement' have shifted a bit in our recent times. Engagements should be as brief as possible. A couple should be engaged only as long as it takes to arrange the wedding and a place to live (neither need be lavish, if this will prolong things!), but no more. Lengthy engagements tend to lead to trouble. Marriage is sacred, and if the 'evil accuser' is allowed to stir up some trouble and sabotage things, he will do his smarmy best—so don't leave him any opportunity! Get moving and get married, it's a Mitzvah!


[Ed. note: Also read "Is it ok to make a wedding on any date?"]

Footnotes

  • 1. See "When exactly does the period of mourning of the Omer start, and when does is it end?" (http://www.askmoses.com/qa_detail.html?h=535&o=19376).
  • 2. Considered auspicious, since these are the days when the moon waxes.

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RELATED CATEGORIES

Life Cycle » Marriage » The Wedding
Miscellaneous » The Jewish Calendar

Mitzvah
(pl. Mitzvot). A commandment from G-d. Mitzvah also means a connection, for a Jew connects with G–d through fulfilling His commandments.
Leap Year
Every 2-3 years an extra month is added to the Jewish calendar. Since the lunar year, which Jews follow, is 11 days shorter than the solar year, it is necessary to keep pace, so that holidays corresponding to certain seasons remain in sync. On a leap year, a second month of Adar is added.
Passover
A Biblically mandated early-spring festival celebrating the Jewish exodus from Egypt in the year 1312 BCE.
Sukkot
A seven day autumn festival commemorating the miracle of the Heavenly Clouds which enveloped the Jews while traveling in the desert for forty years. On this holiday we dwell in makeshift booths and shake the Four Species.
Shevat
The eleventh month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to January-February.
Tishrei
The seventh month of the Jewish calendar. This month, which arrives in early autumn, has more holidays than any other month: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Simchat Torah.
Yom Kippur
Day of Atonement. This late-autumn high-holiday is the holiest day of the year. We devote this day to repentance and all healthy adults are required to fast.
Adar
The twelfth month on the Jewish calendar. This month (which falls out approx. February-March), is the most joyous month on the calendar due to the holiday of Purim which is on the 14th and 15th of this month.
Nissan
The first month of the Jewish calendar. This month, which falls out in early spring, is known for the holiday of Passover which starts on the 15th of Nissan.
Tevet
The tenth month on the Jewish calendar. Falls out in mid-winter.
Iyar
The second month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to April-May. The 18th of this month is the holiday of Lag b'Omer.
Sivan
The third month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to May-June. This month features the holiday of Shavuot.
Kislev
The ninth month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to November-December. The holiday of Chanukah starts on the 25th of this month.
Elul
The 6th month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to August-September. This is the month which precedes Tishrei, the month of the High Holidays, and is a month of introspection and repentance.
Cheshvan
The eighth month of the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to October-November.
Av
The fifth month of the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to July-August. The saddest month of the year due to the destruction of the Temples, and the many other tragedies which befell the Jews in this month.
Tammuz
The fourth month on the Jewish calendar, normally corresponding to June-July.