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What is "Tikun Olam"?

by Rabbi Moshe Miller

  

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The concept of Tikun Olam actually derives from the daily Liturgy. In the second half of the Aleinu prayer we say "... to perfect the world (l'takein olam) under the sovereignty of the Almighty."

What is the process of Tikun by which the world is perfected? According to the Kabbalists, Tikun is the spiritual process of liberating and retrieving the fragments of Divine light trapped within the material realm, unconscious of G-d's presence, thereby restoring the world to its initially intended state of perfection. This is accomplished through the performance of mitzvahs.

Unfortunately the concept of Tikun Olam has has been subverted by people who do not understand the concept from a Torah viewpoint
Unfortunately the concept of Tikun Olam has has been subverted by people who do not understand the concept from a Torah viewpoint. Thus the term "Tikun Olam" is often used today in a social agenda to "promote social justice, freedom, equality, peace and the restoration of the environment." Although these things may be good things in and of themselves, the manner in which they are carried out often contradicts Torah Law, the very opposite of true Tikun Olam.

For an interesting article on the subject see http://www.inner.org/noahide/noach2.htm


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Torah
Torah is G–d’s teaching to man. In general terms, we refer to the Five Books of Moses as “The Torah.” But in truth, all Jewish beliefs and laws are part of the Torah.
G-d
It is forbidden to erase or deface the name of G-d. It is therefore customary to insert a dash in middle of G-d's name, allowing us to erase or discard the paper it is written on if necessary.