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Can you recommend any good books on the ten sefirot?

by Rabbi Yossi Marcus

  

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“Ten Keys for Understanding Human Nature” by Rabbi Mattis Kantor. Another good book is one that deals only with last seven—Chessed through Malchut, and that is authored by Rabbi Simon Jacobson. It’s called “A Spiritual Guide to the Counting of the Omer”; check out http://www.meaningfullife.com. If you’re into self-improvement, this is a good book for you.

For more technical and esoteric info you might want to try Immanuel Schochet’s “Mystical Concepts in Chassidism” from http://www.kehotonline.com, which deals with a number of Kabbalistic concepts including the sefirot.

Happy readings.

TAGS: ten sefirot

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books about the sefirot

Posted by: B. on Jan 18, 2006

Try Sefer Yetzira, chapter one. The best (and least comprehensible) explanation of the ten Sefirot. Read it slowly, in sections, late at night by the light of a candle. Meditate on each mishnah. If you do not gain a greater understanding of the Ten Sefirot, then you may request a full refund.

RELATED CATEGORIES

Torah » Kabbalah » Kabbalistic Concepts

Kabbalistic
(adj.) Pertaining to Kabbalah—Jewish mysticism.
Omer
Starting from the second day of Passover, we count forty-nine days. The fiftieth day is the holiday of Shavuot. This is called the “Counting of the Omer” because on the second day of Passover the barley “Omer” offering was offered in the Holy Temple, and we count forty-nine days from this offering. [Literally, "Omer" is a certain weight measure; the required amount of barley for this sacrifice.]