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If I am a guest, am I covered by the hostess' Shabbat candle lighting?

by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg

  

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A woman’s candle lighting only covers her household. This includes guests who will be eating together with the family and are sleeping in the same home—but do not have their own designated living quarters. (“Living quarters” means a suite which contains self sufficient living space. A guest bedroom is not considered independent living quarters).

Guests who will be joining the family for the Shabbat meal, but will not be sleeping in the same home should light Shabbat candles in the home where they will be sleeping.1

Guests who will be joining the family for the Shabbat meal, but have their own designated living quarters should light their candles in their own rooms.

Guests who will be joining the family for the meal, and do not have their own designated living quarters technically are not obligated to light their own candles, but customarily do so anyway, and they light together with the hostess in the eating area.  

Footnotes

  • 1. Care must be taken that the candles are large enough that they should still be lit when the guests return to their home after the meal—otherwise, the candles served no purpose. Alternatively, the guests can spend some time next to the candles before they leave to their host’s home. Consult with your rabbi if neither of these options are a possibility.

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RELATED CATEGORIES

Women & Judaism » Women's Mitzvot » Candle Lighting

Shabbat
(pl: Shabbatot). Hebrew word meaning "rest." It is a Biblical commandment to sanctify and rest on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. This commemorates the fact that after creating the world in six days, G-d rested on the seventh.