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Is any candle kosher for Shabbat candle-lighting?

by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg

  

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In years gone by most candles were made of tallow (rendered animal fat). However, since the candles are used in and around food and dishes it has become the accepted practice to use only non animal fat based candles, in case they drip on food or dishes. Most candles today are made from paraffin wax.

All candles which are manufactured today emit a clean stable flame and are kosher
Halachah discusses different kinds of fuels and wicks which are invalid for use on the Shabbat, because the flame that they produce is jumpy and unstable. Therefore, there is the concern that perhaps one will try to adjust the flame to stabilize it -- and this is forbidden on Shabbat.

However, all candles which are manufactured today emit a clean stable flame, and are, therefore, Kosher.

The color of the candles is irrelevant; all colors are fine.


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RELATED CATEGORIES

Women & Judaism » Women's Mitzvot » Candle Lighting

Shabbat
(pl: Shabbatot). Hebrew word meaning "rest." It is a Biblical commandment to sanctify and rest on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. This commemorates the fact that after creating the world in six days, G-d rested on the seventh.
Halachah
Jewish Law. All halachah which is applicable today is found in the Code of Jewish Law.
Kosher
Literally means "fit." Commonly used to describe foods which are permitted by Jewish dietary laws, but is also used to describe religious articles (such as a Torah scroll or Sukkah) which meet the requirements of Jewish law.