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How come some foods are certified as kosher if they are not Bishul Yisroel?

by Rabbi Dovid Cohn

www.OUKosher.org

  

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There are 9 potential reasons why the OU can certify a given food even if it isn’t bishul yisroel (Jewish Cooking). This document will summarize those reasons and use a table to identify which reasons (if any) apply to specific foods. The 9 reasons are divided into two groups:

A. Five reasons why a food might be exempt from bishul akum (non-Jewish cooking) regardless of how it is cooked.

B. Four reasons why the method or level of cooking typically done in a factory doesn’t demand bishul yisroel. However, the food may require bishul yisroel if it is cooked differently or when it is prepared by the consumer.

The food doesn’t require bishul yisroel:

  1. Edible raw: Foods which are edible raw are excluded from the prohibition of bishul akum. Foods which people would eat raw but are always pasteurized for safety, are considered edible raw.
  2. Not served at shulchan melachim (kings table): Foods which aren’t fit to be served at shulchan melachim are excluded from the prohibition of bishul akum.
  3. Ta’aruvot (mixtures) which is primarily permitted: In many cases there is no prohibition of bishul akum on foods whose primary components aren’t subject to bishul akum (as above) even if the secondary components are subject to bishul akum.
  4. Tafel (secondary): Foods which are only served at shulchan melachim as an accompaniment to another food aren’t considered oleh al shulchan melachim and are excluded from the prohibition of bishul akum.
  5. Not a tavshil (cooked item): Foods whose brachah rishonah is hamotzi (at all times or at least when one is koveah seudah on them) are considered pat and aren’t subject to the prohibition of bishul akum. Deep fried foods aren’t subject to this leniency. [The OU certifies pat paltar (non-Jewish baker's bread) as Kosher]. No arrangement required by the (but food may otherwise be subject to bishul akum)
  6. Not cooked in plant: There is no need for the OU to arrange for a food to be bishul yisroel if it isn’t cooked (baked or fried) before it is sold.
  7. Smoked or salted: Foods which were salted or cold-smoked (and otherwise not cooked, baked or fried) aren’t considered “cooked” as relates to bishul akum and there is no need for the OU to arrange that such foods be bishul yisroel. Hot-smoked food is considered cooked and is subject to bishul akum.
  8. Steamed in a factory’s specialized equipment: foods cooked with direct steam and in a factory which uses equipment which is radically different than the type used in a home aren’t subject to the prohibition of bishul akum.
  9. Consumer finishes cooking: There is no need for the OU to arrange for a food to be bishul yisroel if the (Jewish) consumer will finish or meaningfully add to a cooking process which was started by a non-Jew in the factory. L’chatchilah this should only be relied upon if the food isn’t k’ma’achal ben drusai (third/half cooked) when it leaves the plant.

There is no need for the OU to arrange for a food to be bishul yisroel if the (Jewish) consumer will finish or meaningfully add to a cooking process which was started by a non-Jew in the factory
Republished with permission from www.oukosher.org


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Kosher
Literally means "fit." Commonly used to describe foods which are permitted by Jewish dietary laws, but is also used to describe religious articles (such as a Torah scroll or Sukkah) which meet the requirements of Jewish law.