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Why is it necessary to use a "Mohel" to perform the Brit Milah?

by Rabbi Shlomo Chein

  

Library » Life Cycle » Circumcision » The Brit | Subscribe | What is RSS?


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Standard medical circumcision is different than the Jewish ritual of "Circumcision" with regards to both its surgical aspects and its intended purpose.

For example, many physicians use a Gamko clamp, which is forbidden according to Jewish law.

Furthermore, circumcision is only one aspect of the Jewish ritual Brit Milah, which actually means "Covenant of Circumcision". 

A Brit Milah isn’t just surgery; it is the sealing of a covenant between a Jewish child and his Creator.  Thus even if a doctor can perform the surgery (Milah) in an adequate/Halachic manner, nonetheless in order to achieve the special covenant (Brit), it is necessary for it to be performed by a G-d fearing Jew, someone who lives by that very covenant.

Practically speaking as well, your best choice is an experienced Mohel who is a specialist in the field, oftentimes performing such procedures on an almost daily basis. By having the Brit performed by a qualified Mohel one is assured that the entire procedure is acceptable to all halachic standards, and performed in a most medically competent manner.


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Halachic
Pertaining to Jewish Law.
Brit
[Lit. Covenant] Circumcision. The act of removing ones foreskin 8 days after birth, perpetuating a covenant with G-d originally established by the Patriarch Abraham.
Mohel
One who performs ritual circumcisions.
G-d
It is forbidden to erase or deface the name of G-d. It is therefore customary to insert a dash in middle of G-d's name, allowing us to erase or discard the paper it is written on if necessary.