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A Day for Children

by Rabbi Shea Hecht

  

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June 4, 2006 was established as National Child’s Day to “reaffirm our commitment to America’s children and recognize the power that each of us has to make a difference in a young person’s life.”

Though the words sound good and the idea of recognizing our ability to make a difference in a child’s life is something that should be highlighted,  I have very strong feelings both for and against a day set aside to celebrate our influence in the lives of children. On the one hand, a day that reaffirms our commitment to our children is a day that’s time has finally come. On the other hand, why should a day for children be necessary?

Many people are not too happy about Father’s Day and Mother’s Day because they feel that to set aside one day as the day to be grateful to our parents is in some way denying that every day that we have on this earth is thanks to our parents. If the idea behind these special days was that our parents are special 365 days a year and we say a thank you on this day it would be a beautiful celebration. Mother’s Day and Father’s day are not viewed that way, though. Most people regard these days like the one day to show gratitude to their parents even though they may neglect them the rest of the year.

Child’s Day can be a positive experience, too, and serve the same purpose by helping us refocus our priorities and reminding ourselves that our children should be our number one priority
In that same vein Child’s Day is ludicrous. Our children are our greatest commodity. They are our future. We must guard them and treat them like treasures they are. To set aside only one day a year to acknowledge that we can make a difference in one child’s life is almost sacrilegious.  How sad that we’ve reached a point that we need a day to “reaffirm our commitment to America’s children and recognize the power that each of us has to make a difference in a young person’s life.”

On the other hand, it’s nice that finally someone is finally giving recognition to the fact that giving our children the attention and affection they deserve is something noteworthy - and worth a “special day.” People do use Father’s Day and Mother’s Day to acknowledge their parents and say thank you to them for bringing them into this world. Child’s Day can be a positive experience, too, and serve the same purpose by helping us refocus our priorities and reminding ourselves that our children should be our number one priority. One day set aside to remind us that our children are special and need to be treated as such cannot be a bad thing.


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