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Sufganiyot (Traditional Donuts)

by Spice and Spirit

  

Library » Holidays » Chanukah » Recipes | Subscribe | What is RSS?


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Donuts, an old-fashioned treat, are never quite as good when store-bought. Try them homemade!

Ingredients:

1 ? ounces fresh yeast
1 ? cups warm water
1 Tbsp. sugar
3 eggs
? cup oil
? cup sugar
? cup non dairy creamer
1 tsp. Vanilla extract
1 tsp. Grated lemon peel
6 to 7 cups of flour 

Oil for frying
Confectioners' sugar

Use: 2-quart pot
Yields: 5 to 6 dozen donuts

Place yeast, water and sugar in a small bowl. Allow to stand several minutes until bubbly.

In a large mixer bowl: place eggs, oil, sugar, nondairy creamer, vanilla, and grated lemon peel. Add yeast mixture; add flour until soft dough is formed. (Dough need not be dry; it should be softer than Challah dough.) Knead for a few minutes. Cover and allow to rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 to 1-? hours.

Roll out dough 1/2-inch thick on floured surface. Cut out circles with a donut cutter.

Place 2 or 3 inches oil in a 2-quart saucepan and heat over a medium flame until hot. Place four donuts at a time in the oil. Brown on one side and then on the other. Remove with slotted spoon. Drain and cool on paper towels. Dust with confectioners' sugar.

Note: To test if dough is ready for rolling, place a small piece in a glass of water-if the dough floats to the top, it is ready.

From Spice and Spirit, The Complete Kosher Jewish Cookbook, published by Lubavitch Women's Cookbook Publications


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Kosher
Literally means "fit." Commonly used to describe foods which are permitted by Jewish dietary laws, but is also used to describe religious articles (such as a Torah scroll or Sukkah) which meet the requirements of Jewish law.
Challah
A loaf of bread. Usually refers to: 1) The section of dough separated and given to the priest (today that section is burnt). 2) The sweetened, soft bread customarily consumed at the Sabbath meals.
Lubavitch
Also known as “Chabad,” Lubavitch is the name of a Chassidic Group founded in the 1770s. “Lubavitch” is the name of the Belarusian city where four of the Chabad Rebbes (leaders) were based. Today, the movement is based in Brooklyn, New York, with branches worldwide. Two of the most fundamental teachings of Chabad are the intellectual pursuit of understanding the divine and the willingness to help every Jew who has a spiritual or material need.